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Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)
'lin sana'a. rick: the president addressing the japan crisis during a news conference. >> i want to be very clear, we do not expect harmful levels of radiation to reach the united states, whether iting the west coast, hawaii, alaska, or u.s. territories in the pacific. rick: officials in japan are calling it a race against time. we have video for you of water being dropped into the overheating reactors at the fukushima plant. this is something that has not proven successful in the past. japan is raising the severity of the situation from a 4 to a 5. the government is acknowledging that it was overwhelmed and continues to be overwhelmed by the situation. gavin blair is on the phone from japan. i understand you are traveling to sendai, which is one of the areas hardest hit by this catastrophy. >> reporter: we just popped through the u.s. exclusion zone or the japanese he can collusion zone. it has been reclassified up to a 5. the chopper missions to drop water has had minimal effect on cool the plant. they tried hosing the plant with fire engines. but apparently the fire truck hoses couldn't
up right after this. see you. tuesday. disaster in japan. another explosion in fukushima. radiation from the blast reportedly blowing offshore. then a nuclear watchdog group upgrading the severity of the situation a 6 on a 7-point scale. chernobyl was a 7. 3 mile island was a 5. we are somewhere in between both of those in a moment. alisyn: the situation seem to be getting more dangerous. all four reacto rereacross -- as seem to be affected. listen to the prime minister. >> the radiation level is high and there is a high chance of further radiation from here on. anyone within a 20-mile range of fukushima needs to evacuate. i understand most people did. and we urge people within a 20-30 mile range to stay indoo indoors. bill: this is the plant in question. there are four different reactors that are of concern. here is number one, here is number two, number 3 and number 4. all of these reactors on the picture you see now. this is how they were intact before the earthquake happened and the tsunami wiped them out. here is where we are now. saturday you reactor number one you had an expl
'm bill hemmer. welcome back, alisyn. alisyn: i'mal lynn cam rata in for martha. >> northern japan was hit by a massive magnitude 9.0 earthquake. i feel deep in my heart as i see the conditions in the affected area. i'm concerned about the nuclear situation because it's unpredictable. with the help of those involved i hope things will not get worse. bill report emperor is in his as it and he's rarely seen on television. show you where we are right now. northeast of tokyo, 200 miles, the fukushima plant in an animation we put together to show you what's happening on the inside as it runs north to the south. you will see the four reactors at this plants in question. there were 6 reactors under consideration but for sake of this purpose we'll show you reactor number 1, 3, and 4. 1, 2, 3 were online when the quake and same rolled through. number 4 was offline. about it was rolling with spent nuclear fuel. then we can show you where we are today. that's what they looked like 7 days ago. on this map here, this was taken two days ago. the four reactors are on the screen. this is number 4, and num
's happening in japan. >> thank you, mr. president. i have two question. on the tragedy in japan. so you already touched on the issue in your opening statement but i'd like to ask about your personal feeling on the situation. you went to japan last year. now, tsunami hit coast of japan and waves washed away cars and houses and japanese people are devastated. i just want to ask about your personal thoughts and feelings on that. and secondly, you also touched on assistance from the united states to japan. and japanese government said that the japan asked for help from u.s. forces in japan. are you willing to provide those assistance? >> the answer to your second question is, yes. i told prime minister kan we'll provide whatever assistance they need. my understanding is the main assistance to provide them is lift capacity. the ability for us to i think help in the cleanup. obviously, when you have a tsunami like this, as well as an earthquake, you have huge disruptions both in the infrastructure. you have boats and houses and cars that are washed in to main thoroughfares and any assistance
alert. t the disaster in japan keeps getting worse. japanese officials confirm that a meltdown could be occurring and we will have the latest. >> dave: this as the death toll is rising, the number of people killed could top a staggering 10,000 in one state alone. >> clayton: take a look at this, satellite image showing what a city in japan looked like before and then after the tsunami. stunning images show how powerful the natural disaster really was. "fox & friends," hour two, starts right now. . >> dave: for many of you it's hour number one, those of you that didn't spring forward and get the clocks reset. it is hour number two. >> clayton: and a lot happening. the nuclear explosion in one of the plants was-- the word from the government that the plant is on the verge of a meltdown. >> alisyn: hard to know. what's the late s, david. >> reporter: there's a warning from the government that there could be an explosion at the plant, there's been a build up of hydrogen, different from the one yesterday and warning that there could have been already a partial meltdown of one of the unit
. the "news nation" is following the latest on the nuclear emergency in japan where it is 3:00 a.m. local time. threat level is now being called a six out of seven by the french authority of nuclear safety. a watchdog group that monitors radiation safety. chernobyl, for some perspective here, was six out of serve. three mile island was rated a five. latest explosion in unit two of the fukushima plant may be the worst yet. international atomic energy agency says there's evidence it breached the primary containment shell. that means more radiation could be leaking from that unit. the iaea says radiation levels at site have been decreasing. people living within 20 kilometers of the plant have been evacuated and are lining up to be scanned for radiation. a no-fly zone has been established around the crippled nuclear plant for 30 kilometers. global economic fears, the stock market plummeted today because of the nuclear concerns and right now the dow, let's take a look at it, is down 178 point. it mentioned it opened down nearly 300 points earlier. today one of the biggest aftershocks to hit japan s
>>> welcome to nhk news world line. the u.s. embassy announced the head of japan affairs at the state department kevin maher has been fired. visiting u.s. assistant secretary of state kurt campbell, in facted him of the move on thursday in their talks on thursday. they say a former deputy chief will assume the post. maher reportedly told some college students in the u.s. last december that okinawans are masters of manipulation and extortion. he was referring to the relocation of a u.s. marines air space station in the southern most prefecture. in the talks with takeaki matsumoto, campbell said maher's comments are unacceptable and contrary to u.s. policy and its respect for the people of okinawa. >>> japan's two major stock exchange operators will explore the possibility of consolidating their businesses. the talks will be aimed at bolstering japan's standing in the world equity market, amid growing pressure for realignment in the industry. if they agree to integrate operations it will have a listing of 4,000 stocks, rivaling the world's leading forces. the two will likel
ahead. >>> also the disaster in japan. the nuclear radiation contaminates food and another powerful aftershock rocks the area near that troubled power plant. >>> and comparisons to chernobyl. how does the japan nuclear crisis compare with the world's worst nuclear accident? we'll take you to chernobyl, some 25 years after that catastrophe. >>> good morning. welcome to "msnbc saturday." i'm alex witt. just past 9:00 on the east. 6:00 a.m. out west. what's happening for you. dramatic twists on the ground in libya are putting more fresher on international leaders to launch a military response. gadhafi's army rolled into the rebel stronghold of agabenghazi battling rebels in the street. >>> and secretary of state clinton meeting with officials about taking military action in libya. and jim maceda is with us from tripoli. get to benghazi. first up, called the rebel capital. what do we know about the situation there this morning? >> reporter: hi again, alex. the situation is not looking good at all for those rebels in their capitol and for the civilians. the people who live 670,000 of the
>> i've done that. >> yes, you have. that's going to d >>> tonight from japan, this is "world news," reporting on the disaster in the pacific. now, there are four. four troubled nuclear reactors at one site. what happens if they all melt? and who are the 50 brave workers who agreed to stay inside and try to save everyone else? >>> we go out with rescue crews, calling out for signs of life in the rubble. "make a noise," they say. "is anybody there?" hello? is anybody there? is anybody there? and survivors did emerge today. >>> and we tell you what is the real danger for the united states. what about that run on potassium iodide pills? >>> and, on "world news," lessons for all of us, from survivors of that hiroshima radiation 60 years ago. >>> good evening to everyone in the united states. here in japan, as we said, there are 50 workers inside a nuclear power plant, and they are battling the complete unknown at this moment. trying to prevent a nuclear power meltdown. and in this breaking news, we have received word that there is another fire, a new fire under way at one of those reac
ahead. >>> good evening. i'm jenk uygur. three days after a massive earthquake and tsunami hit japan, the devastated country continued to reel today. police officials estimate more than 10,000 people were killed when one village was washed away from the tsunami-ravaged northern coast. the death toll is certain to rise. as day breaks in japan, it's a race against time to find survivors. officials say some 350,000 people are homeless and staying in shelters. as you can see the pictures there, it is absolutely devastation. you can see why there are so many people homeless. their homes are gone. emergency workers are frantically trying to cool down the reactors at the troubled fukushima daiichi nuclear power plant, located about 60 miles south of the earthquake's epicenter. there have already been two explosions at this power plant, generating from reactors one and three, first on saturday and then a second one today. today's blast injured 11 people and government authorities told people within 12 miles to stay indoors. if i was them, i would not stay indoors, i would run for the hills.
retaliation and destabilization of the region. but first, we turn to japan. where emergency workers are feverishly trying to cool down overheating fuel rods at the earthquake and tsunami-stricken nuclear plant. a u.n. nuclear official says the situation is "very serious." but appears to be stable. for now. the u.s. authorized the first evacuations of americans out of japan and president obama says he has asked for a comprehensive review of u.s. nuclear plant safety. correspondent greg palkot is in japan with the latest. >> reporter: there were desperate measures thursday in the fukushima nuclear plant in northeastern japan. helicopters doused water on overheating reactors to avoid a catastrophic core meltdown. the facility was sprayed down with more water from fire trucks. while authorities say there is some stabilization, they admit the method had little effect in reducing temperatures at the plant. others say even if a power line reaches coolant pumps they might not work. >> this is a very severe situation. we need to keep coolings at the fuel so that it doesn't reach criticality.
libyahrain, two wars and japan all facing problems and the president's responses are getting both praise and criticism. >>> you've seen it, you felt it, gas, food, cars, prices all going up and there's a price record that's hit a three-decade record, but could it be good? >>> how much would you pay for this red tibetan mastiff, i have a hint. he's the most expensive dog in the world. i'm in for chris jansing. the united states is evacuating the citizens that want to leave japan. a united nations forecast showing a possible radioactive plume hitting southern california tomorrow. u.s. officials insist people in japan could stay 50 miles away from the fukushima daiichi plant, much farther away than what the japanese government is telling its own people. helicopters once again scrambling to dump seawater onto this complex, and at the same time workers are racing to finish building a new power line that could restart the cooling system and thus give the relief to the overheating nuclear rods that everybody has been watching. officially the death toll now stands at more than 5y 300, abo
and strong allies in japan, as they've come to terms and wrestled with this challenging situation. most of you know that our equipment that we sent over to support them has arrived on a c-17. we sent a team of 33 additional people which were in addition to the six people we already had out there in japan. they had over 17,000 pounds of equipment with them. they've unpacked that. they've taken the two pods that do the aerial measurement of ground depositions and mounted them, one on a fixed-wing aircraft and one on a helicopter and we flew those aircraft on their first missions. we've been collecting information as they've come back. we're in the process of sharing that information with our japanese hosts and while that's still being looked at, preliminary indications are that they're consistent with the recommendations that came down from the nuclear regulatory commission. so indications are, it looks like the 50-mile evacuation was prudent. other countries around the world continue to do what they can do support the japanese as they lead this effort to address this challenge. we've had
it for us today. i'm dylan ratigan. "hardball with chris matthews" starts right now. >>> escape from japan. let's play "hardball." >>> good evening. i'm christ matthews in washington. happy st. patrick's day. leading off tonight, high anxiety. here's how desperate it's gotten at that nuclear plant over in japan. authorities have been reduced to dumping water from helicopters and spraying water from fire trucks in a last-ditch effort to cool those spent fuel rods. in a moment, we'll hear from a nuclear power regulatory commissioner and get a report from the ground in japan. >>> also, credibility gap. the widening chasm between what the japanese government is saying and what we can believe. it happened at three mile island. it really happened at chernobyl and now it's happening at japan, officials playing down the dangers. we'll try to bridge the credibility gap tonight. >>> plus, the nuclear disaster has once again turned u.s. public opinion, obviously, against nuclear power. could have predicted that. but that hasn't stopped die-hard supporters from calling this a once-in-a-lifetime fluke
american evacuations out of japan as nuclear meltdown fears grow. >>> line of fire. security cameras capture a dramatic shootout at a tennessee convenience store. >>> and space odyssey. astronauts unveil the international space station's newest resident. good morning, everyone. i'm lynn berry. those stories and more are straight ahead. this is "first look" on msnbc. >>> we begin this morning with exit strategy. as japan's nuclear crisis deepens, and reports about the status of one of its crippled nuclear plants differ, the united states has authorized the first evacuations of americans out of japan. nbc's tracie potts joins us from washington with the very latest on this. good morning to you. >> reporter: lynn, good morning. good morning, everyone. we learned overnight these will be voluntary evacuations even though the airports have opened, commercial flights are available. the u.s. state department will now be organizing charter flights out of tokyo and other locations in japan to get americans out. the u.s. believes that the radiation levels, especially around the fukushima daiich
>>> good morning. disaster in japan. another 1,000 bodies washed up along japan's earthquake and tsunami-ravaged coast, as the nuclear crisis deepens, with a new explosion at an already damaged power plant. ann curry reports live from the region still reeling from the massive disaster today, monday, region still reeling from the massive disaster today, monday, march 14, 2011. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> the images continue to haunt us all. welcome to "today" on a monday morning. i'm matt lauer. >> i'm meredith vieira. japan's prime minister calling this the gravest crisis in his country since world war ii. >> the death toll is now estimated at 10,000. that's expected to climb. so far, about 2,800 people are confirmed dead including those 1,000 bodies discovered overnight. meanwhile, 11 workers have been injured during a second hydrogen explosion today at the fukushima nuclear plant and the u.s. military shifted some of the fleet further away from shore after military personnel were exposed to low level radiation. the state department is warning americans
will this nuclear crisis in japan get? all four reactors at the fukushima plant are damaged terrifying the local population. people are evacuating the area and even moving away from cities as far away as tokyo. out of 800 workers on the site of the nuclear plants, 50 are still there. only 50 and they are in a very dangerous situation. we'll get a report on the ground on how serious the situation is and what it could mean for americans here at home. >>> plus, how much radiation can anyone be exposed to before risking significant health problems? we'll talk to the experts about how much is too much. >>> i'm going to talk to the weather channel of all people about which direction the winds are now blowing and who is in harm's way. also no surprise here, calling for yet another war. this time it's libya. neocons are asking for a no-fly zone to force gadhafi from power. >>> if a little knowledge is a dangerous thing, how will little knowledge affect michelle bachmann's chances. even well known politician have scant knowledge of their own country's history. we start with the crisis in japan. david alb
that libya is sending gas prices to japan, americans are pessimistic about our economy. a new cnbc poll has 37%, more than a third now, say the economy will get worse in the next year. that is bad news. that's a 16-point rise in the bad news estimate since december. and the poll's all-time high we're really pessimistic about it now. >>> obviously the united states is pleased with yesterday's vote. it sent a strong message that needs to be heated. the efforts by the international community to come together to make clear to colonel gadhafi that he cannot continue violence against his own people. they cannot continue the attack that started out by peacefully demonstrating for changes that are within the right of any human being. >> well there you have it. secretary clinton. welcome back to hardball. secretary clinton today. what's next? the representative to the united nations, national securities reporter mark thompson. let me ask you -- i read two things at the same time. one through the united states through the president reading a particular u.n. resolution. we're going with a no-fly zone
in japan, talking directly about the nuclear crisis for the first time. the president offering help and reassuring folks in the u.s. that they are safe. >> we are bringing all available resources to bear to closely monitor the situation and to protect american citizens who may be in harm's way. we do not expect harmful levels of radiation to reach the united states, whether it's the west coast, hawaii, alaska, or u.s. territories in the pacific. >> his comments coming amid raids of rising doubts about japan's ability to control this reactor and a potential full-on meltdown. the attempt to cool down the reactors by spreading them with water dropped out of helicopters apparently having little to no impact. restoring power to the plant not happening until tomorrow at the earliest, which would resurrect the water cooling systems. radiation levels at 300 feet above the plant measured today at nearly 9 r.e.m. by comparison, a chest c.t. scan has just about 0.7 r.e.m. you have to get up to 50 to 75 r.e.m. to get immediate symptoms like hair loss as a result of exposure. so, a lot of exposu
now go to anderson cooper with "ac 360" live from japan. >>> piers, it is truly an extraordinary development to find somebody alive eight days, particularly remarkable when you consider so many of the injuries and the deaths we've seen were caused by that tsunami with all that debris and fast moving water. remarkable that this person apparently survived that long. and also with freezing cold temperatures at night. we'll try to find out more details on that. also the latest on the nuclear emergency that is ongoing right now. in the fukushima daiichi plant. the latest information on that is that the japanese government is finally admitting that the situation has indeed been worse than previously acknowledged. the government giving a grimmer assessment of the disaster, raising the threat level to level five out of seven, conceding it is worse than they previously said, something america's top nuclear regulator has been saying for two days. the wind had been blowing out to sea. it is now blowing on shore. we'll tell you what that means for cities like tokyo. according to "the new yor
including what's going on in japan. joins us now from new york to tell us what's come up at 7:00 on "gma." . >> that's right. good morning, janelle. coming up on the show, we'll have the latest on the major setback in japan. japanese power company officials say they knew about extremely high radiation levels before three workers suffered severe burns. we'll have more on the new details coming up in the show. also ahead, a new warning about artificial food coloring. the government says it may worsen hyperactivity in some kids. and now the f.d.a. is looking to taking action. plus new research shows that 51% of americans over the age of 12 are on facebook. we'll take a look at how the social media giant is changing the way we communicate. and incredible images of a man who spotted a massive shark and unlike everyone else and everything else we do, instead of turning away, he decided to grab his kayak and paddle out for a closer look. we'll talk to him later on this morning in this show. it's pretty incredible. he went out towards the shark and lived to tell about it. >> we wish you were he
. >>> plus the other huge story out of japan. the latest news from japan is not encouraging. smoke out of the two reactors forced workers out of the area today and now traces of radiation have been found in water, in seawater, and in food. and finally, you know things are getting bad for sarah palin when she criticizes president obama in india over his handling of libya and gets bashed by conservatives for being out of her depth. conservatives, mind you, and being illiteratology foreign affairs. >>> we start with the war in libya. richard engel, the best in the business, joins us from tobruk. what is happening in this war? i can't ask a wider question, richard. what is going on in the war? are we going after gadhafi? what are we doing in this war exactly do we know? >> reporter: the rebels here think we are giving them unconditional military support. their only strategy seems to be allow the u.s. and other military powers to scorch the earth and destroy gadhafi's military so that they can make a very slow advance toward tripoli. they do see there was a humanitarian element to this beca
to the latest headlines out of japan, a measuring station in california has picked up radiation read innings the southern part of the state. a diplomat with access to the numbers says they are about a billion times beneath levels considered harmful to humans. and meantime, the crisis at the fukushima plant is getting worse. japanese authorities raise the accident rating from a 4 to a 5 after finding evidence of a partial meltdown in three of the reactor. a level 5 is the same classification as three mile island. japan's prime minister is asking the nation to come together to rebuild devastated areas. authorities say the number of confirmed dead is more than 6,900 and more than 10,000 people are missing. joining me now to talk about the latest developments in the nuclear crisis is arjoun makisani. arnie gunderson was an expert into the investigation of the three mile island accident. arnie, i'll start with you, now that we have this classification that puts japan at the same level as three mile island. >> this in my opinion is already worse than three mile island and should be a 6 instead of
of damage. they say it could take five years for japan to rebuild. but economists are saying that despite initial detrimental affects to the japanese economy, the rebuilding will likely end up as a good thing in the long term. which honestly, i don't believe. japan is a crushing debt burden and this cannot help that. it's interesting. me versus the economists of the world. let's see who's right. all right, now, what's the acceptable amount of military power in libya and will operation odyssey dawn work? we look at examples of u.s. military intervention in the past to the see what worked and what didn't work to help us determine what we can do right in libya. we'll get answers from colonel jack jacobs and juan cole next. so you have five brothers. tough being the only girl. aw, there's the man of the house. who's this ? this is rufus. hey, rufus. he's actually pretty talented. you wanna see him do a trick ? ok. hey rufus. who do we love ? we love our bank. we love our bank. we love our bank. we love our bank. yes, yes. you really love your bank don't you. ally bank customers love our 24/7
. >> reporter: the latest in japan japanese safety officials say they suspect the reactor core at the net one of the troubled power plant may have been breached. that raises the possibility of more severe radioactive contamination to the merriment. japan's police agencies as the death toll from the earthquake and tsunami that happened two weeks ago today has top-10 thousand people. more than 17,000 people are still listed as missing. the 6.8 man omar earthquake was felt as far as thailand and china. 20 people are believed to been killed. that death toll could continue to rise it is an underdeveloped country with poor communication. a very small rescue capacity is not going to make things easy there. the country peg the quake at some 0.0 which is higher than the measurement that the u.s. geological survey pin did that. >> darya: african union meeting in ethiopia will be trying to deal with the situation in libya. rebels and the government of khaddafi are expected to be there. french fighter jets hit aircraft and cross road military base deep inside of libya. they have been effectively neutrali
germany and japan pay for their defense. it's time to not get involved in every single war. now, you know, you would think the finances would make them hesitant about going into libya, but they're not even pausing. i mean, the plans are being laid. so, yes, i think the coalition should be built, and we should work our way out of it. but i'm right now pessimistic that that is going to happen because of the pain of the special interests groups because the many people who come to my office now and say hey, you'd better get this budget in line, usually leave the office by saying please don't cut mine. cut somebody else's. and that's where we are. >> how much of the cutting issues i wouldn't say distract, but are only half the story. we have a huge revenue decline in this country because of unemployment. people don't have jobs, they don't pay taxes, there's not revenue. we have a huge revenue decline in this country because of the dysfunction and screwed-up nature of our housing market. how much is the failure of this congress, the congress before this congress, and we can continue back into h
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)